Knowledge Center

Make Feedback Feel Normal

Let’s face it, giving and receiving feedback can be uncomfortable. To make it easier, you don’t necessarily have to get better at saying the exact right thing; you just need practice. If you see someone doing something they can improve, offer your observations right away. Don’t wait until your next meeting to provide your input; give it in the moment. You want as little time as possible between identifying and discussing the problem. After you address the problem, offer a “patch up” to help them know that you respect them. The biggest predictor of whether someone will become defensive after presented with feedback is the motive behind it. If they know that you’re trying to help them and hold them accountable, they are less likely to push back. 

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How to Respond When You’re Left Out of Important Meetings

We’ve all been left off the invite list before.
 
You find out about an important meeting — one whose outcome affects you and your team — after it happens. When you’re overlooked for a meeting it feels bad personally and professionally. Being left out can conjure up grade school emotions of being excluded or feeling like your opinion and input aren’t valued.
 
And being the last to learn about key decisions can set your team back, and bring your leadership into question. When you don’t get a seat at the table and it’s negatively affecting your team’s ability to collaborate, coordinate, and communicate as they work toward your organization’s goals, it’s your responsibility to come forth, advocate for yourself and your team, and raise the issue in a constructive manner.
 
Next time you discover you’re not on the invite list, don’t despair. Turn the omission into an opportunity to evaluate what you have to offer the group, determine whether the meeting aligns with you and your team’s best interests, and conduct a productive conversation.

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How to manage a toxic employee

There’s that one person on your team — the bad apple who has nothing positive to say, riles up other team members, and makes work life miserable. If you can’t fire him, how do you respond to his behavior? What feedback do you give? How do you mitigate the damage he inflicts?

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Interview Toughest Questions

Questions to describe your own weaknesses is a regular at the job interview. With a little preparation it can be turned to your own advantage.
 
Before a job interview you've probably prepared yourself well, and developed your most presentable outfit. But have you prepared yourself for the most difficult question: "What are your weaknesses?" You can believe what you want about the issue, but you know it is coming, and what answers can be crucial.
 
For those who recruit, it is important to find out if you are right for the job or not, and your weaknesses says as much about you as the strong. For me it's more about how the person responds to the question, than the negative characteristics he or she takes up. Personal appears to be genuine and honest, leader in the Coach House.

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Réseaux sociaux et travail: les règles d’or

LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp, autant d’applications utilisées à la fois à titre privé et professionnel. Peut-on encore séparer les deux? Quelles sont les règles à respecter? Conseils d’experts.

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7 Rules for Job Interview Questions That Result in Great Hires

Some of the long-held ideas about how to conduct interviews are no longer accurate. For example, there’s no such thing as a surprise interview question anymore. With sites like Glassdoor.com, candidates can identify each of your likely interview questions and expected answers ahead of time. With that information, candidates now routinely prepare and video their practice interviews to the point where their responses are universally impressive, if not genuine or accurate. It’s not just surprise questions that are a thing of the past.
 
Research at firms like Google has proven that “brainteaser questions” can contribute to a costly miss-hire, that having a candidate meet any more than four interviewers doesn’t increase new-hire quality, and that for many jobs, factors like grades, test scores, and schools attended don’t predict success in the position. So it’s time to rethink your interview questions with a focus on work-related questions that are harder to prepare for and to fake an answer to.

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Nouveau job: 9 astuces pour réussir sa première semaine

"Les trois premiers mois d'un nouveau job sont la prolongation de l'entretien d'embauche," explique Amanda Augustine, experte en carrières chez TheLadders, un site d'emploi qui met en relation employeurs et demandeurs d'emploi en fonction de leur comptabilité avec le job. "Dès le premier jour, vous devez être au meilleur de vous-même." Avec plus de dix ans d'expérience en conseil aux professionnels de haut niveau à son arc, Amanda Augustine détaille les différentes initiatives prises par les personnes brillantes lors de leur première semaine à un nouveau poste.

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Why You Can’t Get A Job…Recruiting Explained by The Numbers

As a professor and a corporate recruiting strategist, I can tell you that very few applicants truly understand the corporate recruiting process. Most people looking for a job approach it with little factual knowledge. That is a huge mistake. A superior approach is to instead analyze it carefully, because data can help you understand why so many applicants simply can’t land a job. If you can bear with me for a few quick minutes, I can show you using numbers where the job-search “roadblocks” are and how that data-supported insight can help you easily double your chances of landing an interview and a job.

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Les tendances de l'emploi en Suisse pour le premier trimestre 2016

Pour 91 % des employeurs suisses, la tendance des recrutements restera stable au 1er trimestre 2016. Les championnes en la matière seront les PME et le personnel qualifié sera l'objet des convoitises des recruteurs.

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